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Consultation on Childrens Cases in the Family Court

In Autumn 2018 the President of the Family Division invited Mr Justice Keehan (public law) and Mr Justice Cobb (private law), to lead two cross-professional Working Groups, to look at practices and processes in these two areas. On 29 September 2019, YLAL responded to the Interim Reports on public and private law. 

You can read our responses to this consultation below.

 

Quick, Dirty but Important: YLAL's Research into unmet legal need at Court


Concerned by anecdotal evidence from its members about increasing numbers of litigants in person struggling in the County and Magistrates’ courts, and frustrated by the lack of any research into the impact on clients of the first tranche of the most recent changes to legal aid, Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL) has conducted its own study of court users.


YLAL Survey on Paralegals in legal aid: a growing and unhealthy dependency?

Paralegals are being exploited and underpaid, according to a survey of members conducted by Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL). Respondents also raised concerns about lack of training, poor working conditions, uncertain career progression and the implications of Lord Carter’s proposed pyramid model.

YLAL has called on the Law Society and the Legal Services Commission to take firm action to ensure that the sustainability of legal aid is not jeopardised as legal aid firms become more reliant on the use of paralegals to survive.

YLAL Survey on Paralegals in legal aid: a growing and unhealthy dependency?

Paralegals are being exploited and underpaid, according to a survey of members conducted by Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL). Respondents also raised concerns about lack of training, poor working conditions, uncertain career progression and the implications of Lord Carter’s proposed pyramid model.

YLAL has called on the Law Society and the Legal Services Commission to take firm action to ensure that the sustainability of legal aid is not jeopardised as legal aid firms become more reliant on the use of paralegals to survive.