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Conference: The Fight For Social Justice

The Fight For Social Justice: Young Lawyers Making Change

We are delighted to be hosting our second joint conference with Public Law Project and the Legal Education Foundation's Justice First Fellows on Saturday 16 March 2019 at BPP Waterloo in London. 

We have a very exciting programme lined up at this conference, which aims to inform and inspire the social welfare lawyers of the future, build a network of like-minded junior lawyers, and bring together those committed to working in the areas of law traditionally funded by legal aid.  

The event offers:

  • practical advice on practicing in social welfare law and legal aid and the beginnings of a network of future legal aid lawyers committed to social justice
  • careers advice and support with a view to increasing diversity and social mobility within the profession
  • knowledge and experience to improve responses to further threats to legal aid

The event is a partnership between YLAL, Public Law Project, and the Legal Education Foundation's Justice First Fellows, and is supported by the Legal Education Foundation, Garden Court Chambers and BPP Law School.

Tickets for the conference cost just £10 and there is a travel reimbursement scheme (up to £50) for those travelling from outside London. For all details of the conference and to book your ticket, please visit the Public Law Project website.

We hope to see you there!

Quick, Dirty but Important: YLAL's Research into unmet legal need at Court


Concerned by anecdotal evidence from its members about increasing numbers of litigants in person struggling in the County and Magistrates’ courts, and frustrated by the lack of any research into the impact on clients of the first tranche of the most recent changes to legal aid, Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL) has conducted its own study of court users.


YLAL Survey on Paralegals in legal aid: a growing and unhealthy dependency?

Paralegals are being exploited and underpaid, according to a survey of members conducted by Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL). Respondents also raised concerns about lack of training, poor working conditions, uncertain career progression and the implications of Lord Carter’s proposed pyramid model.

YLAL has called on the Law Society and the Legal Services Commission to take firm action to ensure that the sustainability of legal aid is not jeopardised as legal aid firms become more reliant on the use of paralegals to survive.

YLAL Survey on Paralegals in legal aid: a growing and unhealthy dependency?

Paralegals are being exploited and underpaid, according to a survey of members conducted by Young Legal Aid Lawyers (YLAL). Respondents also raised concerns about lack of training, poor working conditions, uncertain career progression and the implications of Lord Carter’s proposed pyramid model.

YLAL has called on the Law Society and the Legal Services Commission to take firm action to ensure that the sustainability of legal aid is not jeopardised as legal aid firms become more reliant on the use of paralegals to survive.